Tag Archives: social media marketing

Social Media Update 2013: A good resource for healthcare marketers.

Who’s being social?  Social Media Update 2013, a new survey from the Pew Research Center’s Internet Project, reveals that:

  • 73% of online adults now use a social networking site of some kind.
  • 71% use Facebook, up from 67% in 2012.
  • Facebook is the dominant social networking platform in the number of users, but users are diversifying; 42% of online adults use multiple social networking sites.
  • User profiles, demographics and engagement rates differ significantly across platforms. For example, Instagram users are nearly as likely as Facebook users to check in to the site on a daily basis; Pinterest skews toward women, higher education and income, while LinkedIn skews higher toward men in prime years.

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These are a few of the key findings and graphics on social networking site usage and adoption from Social Media Update 2013.  The study provides some great insights for your team to consider as they plan digital and content marketing strategies for 2014 – Who uses what platform?  How do they use it?  How often do they check-in?

Click here to browse through or download the full report.

Women are social content producers, brand promoters

mom Healthcare marketers have long known the influence that women have when it comes to the consideration, selection and use of health and medical services.  They can be your best word-of-mouth advocates, or most harsh critics.  It doesn’t take long when browsing through social media sites – Facebook, Twitter, blogs, message boards, consumer review sites such as Angie’s List – to produce significant evidence of how women engage in discussions about health topics AND about healthcare providers.  The good, the bad and, all too often, the ugly.

A recent study by SheKnows, a women’s media platform and a lifestyle  site, provides interesting insights into how women in different age and lifestyle segments use  technology and social networks to build their relationships and personal  identities.  Here’s a quick snapshot of the findings from “Content Producers and Brand Promoters.”

  • Women are producing content at record speed and exerting influence over millions of consumers they have never met.
  • 56% of women share product recommendations through social media.
  • 35% of Millennials recommend products on social media at least once a month and follow, on average, 22 brands.
  • 44% are more likely to go to a brand’s social media page to log a customer service issue than to call the company on the phone.
  • Women trust content produced by their peers; 63% of women ages 18 to 65 consider a friend on social media far more trustworthy than a blogger, a celebrity, or a website editor.

The online study was conducted by Harris Interactive in July-August with over 1,000 U.S. women ages 18-65 who have consumed digital content.  For more insights on women and social media from this study, you can download (with a simple registration) the whitepaper, “Marketing to the ‘Likeable’ Mom: A Report on How Family, Brands, and Technology Influence Her Social Identity” at http://www.sheknows.com/whitepaper.  You can also read the full press release on the study at  PR Web.

Should You Bag Your Facebook Advertising?

by Katie Adams, Corrigan Partners

Just days before Facebook’s scheduled $100 billion IPO one of the largest U.S. manufacturers has dropped all of its paid advertising on the social media site. GM made the decision to axe its $10 million advertising budget based on findings that paid ads on the site “had little impact on consumers.” Before rushing to join the crowd suspect of the relevance of social media, it’s important to note what the car giant said about how they plan to continue interacting with Facebook users. According to a Wall Street Journal article GM marketing chief Joel Ewanick said that GM is “reassessing our advertising on Facebook, although the content is effective and important.”

Did you catch that? “Content is effective and important.”

As chief marketing officers grapple with continued tight budgets and increasing demand for ROI it’s worth examining how you’re using social media as a marketing tool. First, focus on the main reason people use Facebook in the first place. According to the study “Why Do People Use Facebook?” by Boston University researchers Ashwinin Nadkarni and Stefan G. Hoffman, the two primary needs that Facebook satisfies for its nearly 1 billion users are (1) the need to belong and (2) the need for self-presentation. Conversely that means that Facebook is not viewed by the majority of its users as a way to find or buy services or products. So it stands to reason that if you are purchasing ad space on the social media site as a way of quickly generating sales you may be disappointed.

The question isn’t if Facebook is effective as a marketing tool, it’s how is Facebook MOST effective? Are you using the platform to its best marketing objective? GM has chosen to maintain its Facebook presence because it provides a powerful way to engage with customers and influencers as well as to have a pivotal presence in conversations about the industry and its own brand. But the company is aware that it can do that solely by providing CONTENT, not by purchasing paid ad space.

While GM’s decision may have prospective shareholders concerned it should be welcomed by chief marketing officers. GM’s insight should give you pause about your own organization’s position on Facebook as a marketing tool. If the two primary motivators for Facebook users are to belong and to be able to share personal stories and opinions (“self-presentation”) what types of material are you giving them to be able to do just that? Are you creating an engaging community for users? Are you sharing content — information, tips, and tools that they can use and share with others for free? Are you customizing your content so that you are one perceived as a highly relevant voice in their social media world?

Despite the contrarians Facebook isn’t going anywhere. The question is where are you going with Facebook?

Chris Boyer’s Social Media ROI Ragtime

You might be tempted to suggest that Chris Boyer (Director of Digital Marketing & Communications, Inova Health System) keep his day job until you realize that this is his day job! Thanks Chris for this morning’s chuckles. Wish I’d been there to see it in person. (Thanks also to Dan Dunlop for feeding highlights from the Health Care Social Media Summit through his blog – The Healthcare Marketer).